Showing posts tagged sopa
gothiccharmschool:

Truth.

Don’t forget ACTA which I believe is getting voted on tomorrow

gothiccharmschool:

Truth.

Don’t forget ACTA which I believe is getting voted on tomorrow

(Reblogged from gothiccharmschool)
(Reblogged from spooky-cat-vomit)
Feel free to use this STOP SOPA pic wherever and you can download other versions in these sizes <here>
500x500
200x200
100x100
50x50
48x48
And a 900x400 facebook cover banner one with addition information to spread awareness tomorrow.

Feel free to use this STOP SOPA pic wherever and you can download other versions in these sizes <here>

500x500

200x200

100x100

50x50

48x48

And a 900x400 facebook cover banner one with addition information to spread awareness tomorrow.

(Source: sdblaine)

Web Goes On Strike, January 18th 2012!

Join the Internet blackout to stop SOPA & PIPA and petition Twitter and other sites to join us! <link>

I will be online raising awareness on the 18th from 8 am to 8 pm EST in protest and solidarity and am also planning on changing  as many of my profiles pics to blank, default, or black and linking to Reddit where they will be posting information and links explaining what we’re doing and why. You can read their article on the subject here.

If you feel as strongly about stopping PIPA and SOPA as I do I urge you to call your local representative at the very least, as I have, and though not everyone has the luxury of being able to not check their email or shut down their site, every little bit helps.

"Internet censorship is going to a vote in the Senate on January 24th (known as PIPA in the Senate and SOPA in the House). While Senators are in their home states for the January recess, we need to flood their public meetings and offices with our concerns about the bill." - AmericanCensorship.org

While the President and the White House have released a statement vaguely stated that they are against the bill, it still has a lot of support and some form of this bill might make its way through if we aren’t clear about how fast these organizations and politicians will lose our support and patronage if they don’t stop pushing it now.

PROTECT IP / SOPA Breaks The Internet from Fight for the Future on Vimeo.

Another video explaining what PROTECT IP (PIPA) and SOPA are, what they do, and how seriously they could eff things up.

(vid snagged from criminella)

thedailywhat:

A Taste Of Thing To Come? of the Day: Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has just announces via Twitter that he will be joining the anti-SOPA blackout planned for this Wednesday, January 18th.

Starting at midnight EST, the English version of Wikipedia will go dark for 24 hours, crippling student reports everywhere, and hopefully bringing much-needed attention to the Internet killing bill and its congressional sibling, PIPA.

Even though SOPA was shelved over the weekend after President Obama expressed opposition to the bill, it is still expected to reemerge. 

Reddit’s Internet blackout initiative, which was officially unveiled last week, has been steadily picking up steam, with multiple Internet giants announcing their intentions to follow suit.

A list of sites that have confirmed their participation can be found here.

[@jimmy_wales.]

Other sites I use/enjoy that’ll be going dark:

All Cheezburger sites (aka lolcats & Failblog)

Cakewrecks

And you can look at the rest of the list on Reddit via the link in the article above ^

(Reblogged from thedailywhat)
thedailywhat:

This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day: Last year, as part of Operation In Our Sites — a joint initiative by the Department of Justice and Homeland Security’s office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to ostensibly seize the domains of websites hosting copyright infringing material — the popular hip hop music blog Dajaz1.com was taken offline for allegedly posting pirated music.
One small hitch though: The songs ICE claimed were illegally obtained were actually sent to Dajaz1 by the artists and labels that produced the tracks.
The site’s owner, a Queens man who goes by “Splash,” sent the New York Times proof that he was being repeatedly solicited by record label execs and third-party marketers who sought to have their clients’ music posted on the site. “It’s not my fault if someone at a record label is sending me the song,” he said.
Indeed, the government eventually backed down from its claim, and returned the domain to its rightful owner, but not before an entire year had passed, and the value of the site decreased dramatically.
Ross Feinstein, a spokesman for ICE, refused to elaborate on what took so long, beyond telling Ars Technica that “the government concluded that the appropriate and just result was to decline to pursue judicial forfeiture.”
Splash’s attorney, Andrew Bridges, recounted to Techdirt how the government was able to hold onto the site indefinitely by claiming it had received extensions on the window during which it is required to proceed with the forfeiture process or else return the domain.
When he asked to review the extensions he was told they were sealed and could not be released.
An RIAA rep doesn’t think much of what Splash was subjected to, as it still believes the site trafficked in pre-release copies not authorized for commercial distribution.
While Dajaz1 did on occasion make certain songs available for download which it was not explicitly authorized to post, it complied immediately with take-down requests, according to Bridges. Also, as Techdirt points out, the songs used by ICE in the affidavit which allowed it to seize the site in the first place were legally posted after being supplied to Splash by the labels themselves.
“[I]f the RIAA takes the position that none of this music came from music industry reps, by that I mean label reps or artist reps, then that has more to do with the RIAA awareness of what’s going on in its own industry,” said Bridges.
At the crux of this cautionary tale is the fact that ICE was allowed to seize the site’s domain without due process thanks to the PRO-IP Act of 2008.
Legislation to expand ICE’s authority to indefinitely detain domains it suspects of conducting criminal activity is currently making its way through both houses of Congress.
As the Dajaz1 case clearly illustrates, giving the government even more power to censor any site it pleases for as long as it pleases without any concern for Constitutional amendments being trampled in the process is probably, to say the least, not a very good idea.
[techdirt / ars.]

Hence SOPA AND PIPA being a bad idea
Internet Censorship = Do Not Want

thedailywhat:

This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day: Last year, as part of Operation In Our Sites — a joint initiative by the Department of Justice and Homeland Security’s office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to ostensibly seize the domains of websites hosting copyright infringing material — the popular hip hop music blog Dajaz1.com was taken offline for allegedly posting pirated music.

One small hitch though: The songs ICE claimed were illegally obtained were actually sent to Dajaz1 by the artists and labels that produced the tracks.

The site’s owner, a Queens man who goes by “Splash,” sent the New York Times proof that he was being repeatedly solicited by record label execs and third-party marketers who sought to have their clients’ music posted on the site. “It’s not my fault if someone at a record label is sending me the song,” he said.

Indeed, the government eventually backed down from its claim, and returned the domain to its rightful owner, but not before an entire year had passed, and the value of the site decreased dramatically.

Ross Feinstein, a spokesman for ICE, refused to elaborate on what took so long, beyond telling Ars Technica that “the government concluded that the appropriate and just result was to decline to pursue judicial forfeiture.”

Splash’s attorney, Andrew Bridges, recounted to Techdirt how the government was able to hold onto the site indefinitely by claiming it had received extensions on the window during which it is required to proceed with the forfeiture process or else return the domain.

When he asked to review the extensions he was told they were sealed and could not be released.

An RIAA rep doesn’t think much of what Splash was subjected to, as it still believes the site trafficked in pre-release copies not authorized for commercial distribution.

While Dajaz1 did on occasion make certain songs available for download which it was not explicitly authorized to post, it complied immediately with take-down requests, according to Bridges. Also, as Techdirt points out, the songs used by ICE in the affidavit which allowed it to seize the site in the first place were legally posted after being supplied to Splash by the labels themselves.

“[I]f the RIAA takes the position that none of this music came from music industry reps, by that I mean label reps or artist reps, then that has more to do with the RIAA awareness of what’s going on in its own industry,” said Bridges.

At the crux of this cautionary tale is the fact that ICE was allowed to seize the site’s domain without due process thanks to the PRO-IP Act of 2008.

Legislation to expand ICE’s authority to indefinitely detain domains it suspects of conducting criminal activity is currently making its way through both houses of Congress.

As the Dajaz1 case clearly illustrates, giving the government even more power to censor any site it pleases for as long as it pleases without any concern for Constitutional amendments being trampled in the process is probably, to say the least, not a very good idea.

[techdirt / ars.]

Hence SOPA AND PIPA being a bad idea

Internet Censorship = Do Not Want

(Reblogged from thedailywhat)
(Reblogged from spooky-cat-vomit)